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7 things in Bend that’ll totally screw you up

April 20th, 2017

Last week, a magazine fact-checker sent me an article with a caption touting the beauty of Tumalo Falls in Tumalo State Park. The problem? Tumalo Falls isn’t actually in Tumalo State Park. In fact, the two landmarks are miles apart.

It’s one of many things that throws Bend visitors for a loop, and I’m not here to snicker about it. I’m here to clear up 7 of them so you don’t feel like a doofus on your Bend vacation.

Tumalo Falls isn’t in Tumalo State Park?

Blogger Tawna got hitched at Tumalo State Park (which is NOT anywhere near Tumalo Falls).

Let’s start with the one that spawned this blog post, since it’s one of the most common things to trip up Bend visitors.

Tumalo Falls is located about 14 miles west of Bend off Skyliners Road. You can follow these Google Map directions to get you there from the Bend Visitor Center.

Tumalo State Park is about 19 miles northeast of Tumalo Falls, and while it offers a great campground and fab views of the Deschutes River, there’s no waterfall in sight.

Tumalo Mountain is another entity altogether, and isn’t near the waterfall or the State Park (but is worth a hike in the summer months, so add it to your bucket list!)

There’s also the quaint little town of Tumalo, which does happen to be quite close to Tumalo State Park.

Confused yet?

 

It’s the desert, right? So why is it cold?

Yes, Bend is a desert. But it’s a mountainous high desert that sits at 3,600-feet above sea level. “High” is the key word there (and I promise it has nothing to do with legalized marijuana in Oregon).

Bend’s mountain elevation is what makes it a high desert (and also what makes it much colder than a low-elevation desert).

Bend’s altitude is responsible for our snowy winters and conditions that can fluctuate wildly. Even on scorching-hot summer days when temps reach the 90s or even break 100, odds are good you’ll still need a jacket at night. You also need to follow the high altitude instructions on the back of the brownie mix you’re baking at that Bend vacation rental (just sayin’).

 

So Fido can’t run free everywhere?

Bend was named the nation’s dog-friendliest city by Dog Fancy magazine, and the city’s abundance of off-leash dog parks was one reason.

Wanoga SnoPark is one of the places where Fido can run leash-free.

But that doesn’t mean Rover can roam anywhere he likes without a leash. In developed areas of Bend like neighborhoods, campgrounds, and even parking lots, your dog must be leashed at all times. Leash laws are enforced, and fines can be hefty.

Leash laws also apply between May 15 and September 15 on the Deschutes River Trail between Benham Falls and Meadow Camp, and in the Three Sisters Wilderness between the South Sisters climbers trail and Todd Lake.

Dogs are allowed off-leash when playing “river fetch” in National Forest areas, even along restricted trails. But make sure your pooch is well-trained to respond to voice commands and unlikely to tear off after deer or other wildlife.

For more info about doggy etiquette and laws in Bend, check out www.dogpac.org.

And it goes without saying that no matter where you are, you should do your duty when Fido does his doody. Carry waste bags and clean up after your pooch everywhere you go. It’s part of how you Visit Like a Local when you’re in Bend.

 

The snow is gone, so why isn’t everything open?

Visitors are sometimes surprised to arrive in the spring and discover the town itself is snow-free, but major landmarks still closed. What gives?

The Lava Lands Visitor Center typically opens around Memorial Day.

Clearing snow from seasonally-shuttered roadways like the Cascade Lakes Highway and the McKenzie Pass can take a looong time, particularly after a heavy snow year like 2017.

It also affects landmarks like the Lava Lands Visitor Center and Pilot Butte, where safety dictates closures during icier months. Generally speaking, most sites open in the weeks surrounding Memorial Day, though it can take longer for high-elevation attractions.

If you’re wondering about a specific site, call or stop by the Bend Visitor Center for up-to-the-minute info about seasonal closures. You can also keep an eye on the Bend Buzz Blog, where we usually put up a post like this one giving opening dates for major landmarks and roadways.

 

The river runs which way?

For some odd reason, many Bend visitors are under the impression that all rivers flow south.

Ahhh, the beautiful and mighty Deschutes River.

But rivers follow the laws of gravity, and water flowing from the mountains takes the path of least resistance in its journey downhill. In Bend’s case, that means the mighty Deschutes River flows north.

Good to know for all that kayaking, rafting, floating, and standup paddleboarding you’re planning to do in Bend!

 

Around and around and around we go!

For folks living in cities that don’t have traffic circles, Bend’s roundabouts can seem daunting at first glance. My mother steadfastly refuses to drive through one, always petrified she’ll be seized by demons and tempted to drive the wrong way.

Bend’s traffic circles can be a source of confusion for some.

But roundabouts are actually pretty simple. Traffic flows counterclockwise, and traffic entering the roundabout must yield to vehicles already in it.

When you’re ready to exit, use your right turn signal to indicate your intent to leave the roundabout. Failure to signal is one of the most common mistakes drivers make, and you can be fined for not doing it.

Want more tips for navigating Bend’s roundabouts, including some of the multi-lane traffic circles? You’ll find several handy videos here.

 

Which day use park pass do I need?

State Parks Pass, NW Forest Pass, National Parks Pass . . . when it comes to day use permits, how the @#$% do you know which one you need to see all the landmarks on your Central Oregon bucket list?

Elk Lake is one spot where the NW Forest Pass will come in handy.

Let’s start with State Parks. The main ones in Central Oregon are Smith Rock State Park, Tumalo State Park, La Pine State Park, Cove Palisades State Park, and Pilot Butte State Park. Pilot Butte and La Pine are the only two on that roster that don’t require any sort of parking fee or pass. The others charge $5 per day, and there are machines on site that take credit cards to make it nice and easy. Planning to visit more than one state park on multiple days? Splurge for the $30 annual pass or the $50 two-year pass, which we sell here in the Bend Visitor Center. There are no senior discounts for State Park Passes.

Now let’s talk about the NW Forest Pass. This one is my personal fave, since it grants you access to a whole lotta great stuff you’ll want to see around Central Oregon. This includes all the trailheads on National Forest land, like Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Painted Hills National Monument, and all the awesome lakes and trails off the Cascade Lakes Highway. Day use passes are $5, and you’ll find envelopes and drop-boxes at most major sites. But honestly, you’re better off paying $30 for an annual pass that grants you access to everything for the entire year. We sell that in the Bend Visitor Center, too.

Planning to drive the extra miles to Crater Lake National Park? Normal park entrance is $20 for seven days, but here’s a tip if you’re planning to hit gobs of parks on your Bend vacation: Splurge for the $80 Interagency Annual Pass and get access to all Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, and US Fish & Wildlife Service sites that charge entry fees. Be aware, though, that none of these passes – or the NW Forest Pass – is valid at any of the Oregon State Parks. Oh, and if you’re 62 and older, pony up $10 for a lifetime America the Beautiful Senior Interagency Pass that gets you into everything except State Parks.

6 ways to enjoy Bend, Oregon when traveling solo

April 13th, 2017

My husband is traveling on business this week, so I’ve spent lots of time talking to the dog   drinking milk from the carton  exploring Bend on my own.

This could be your cozy home away from home at Wall Street Suites.

Obviously, it’s not the first time in my 42+ years as an Oregonian that I’ve hung out solo in Central Oregon, but it’s the first time I’ve paid super-close attention to the best ways to savor Bend by yourself. Here are 6 of them.

 

Pick the perfect spot to stay

When you’re vacationing solo, sometimes you’d prefer to keep to yourself. That’s easy to do in nearly any Bend hotel or vacation rental, and you can amplify your vacation enjoyment with perks like killer views, in-room spas, or the ability to walk everywhere you want to go (handy if you plan to hit the Bend Ale Trail on your own and want to avoid driving).

Downtown properties like Wall Street Suites and the DoubleTree by Hilton make it simple to stroll between restaurants, bars, and boutique shops. Ditto that for The Oxford Hotel, which has the added bonus of a swanky lower-level restaurant to enjoy when you do feel like interacting with humans.

Hotels in the Old Mill District are another great option for the ease of walking anywhere you need to go for shopping and dining, plus you’ll be mere steps from the Deschutes River and summer concerts at the Les Schwab Amphitheater.

And if you’re a solo traveler who’s actually looking to meet new people, consider one of the cozy, friendly bed and breakfasts in Bend, or check out Bend’s brand new hostel, Bunk & Brew.

 

Table for one?

I’ll admit I’ve felt moments of awkwardness when dining alone as a business traveler or just a local gal who feels like taking herself out on a lunch date.

Parilla Grill’s brand new Eastside location is just as tasty as the Westside one (and makes for awesome solo dining!)

Fortunately, Bend’s dining scene is chill enough that it’s really not an issue. My favorite lunch spots for solo dining include Parilla Grill (especially the awesome new Eastside location!), Longboard Louie’s, Barrio, and Croutons.

El Sancho is another great choice for those who want to dip a toe in the water of meeting new people. Many’s the time I’ve parked myself at one of the large, outdoor tables with a random group of strangers and found myself making a new friend.

Looking to treat yourself to a nice dinner? 900 Wall, Joolz, Greg’s Grill, and Zydeco are all awesome dinnertime options where I swear you won’t feel weird requesting a table all to yourself (though if you prefer, most of those spots have a bar where you can ask to be seated solo).

 

Heading out for a hike

I’ve hiked by myself all over Central Oregon, and aside from a couple rare (and possibly paranoid) moments of fretting about cougars, I’ve always felt safe.

Blogger Tawna and her dog, Bindi, hiking solo in the Badlands.

Nevertheless, it’s a good idea to take some precautions when you’re setting out for a solo hike. Take plenty of water and snacks—just like you would when hiking with pals—but factor in the downside of not having an extra body around for warmth. Then stuff your pack with a few extra warm layers and a space blanket.

Next, make sure you plot your route carefully and take a paper map (no relying on smartphones where you might not have service!) Grab a good guide book like Bend Overall by Scott Cook and Bend, Oregon Daycations (Day Trips for Curious Families), by Kim Cooper Findling to get ideas for routes and what to expect.

And most importantly, let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to be back. That way they can notify authorities if you haven’t returned in a reasonable amount of time.

 

No sense in driving solo

Since invisible friends don’t count, your solo status renders you ineligible to use the carpool spots at Mt. Bachelor.

Leave the driving to someone else when you book an outing with the Bend Brew Bus.

But what a great excuse to catch the Mt. Bachelor shuttle to avoid driving all the way there and back in your own car.

And if you want to hit the Bend Ale Trail without fretting about sober transportation, book an outing with the Bend Brew Bus and leave the driving to someone else.

 

Enjoy your own company

One of my favorite solo activities when traveling is to find a warm, cozy spot to curl up with a good book.

Reading by yourself in the park is one of the best ways to enjoy Bend solo.

When the weather is chilly, I look for a toasty fire pit or a vacation home with a fireplace.

When it’s warm and sunny, check out one of Bend’s 80+ public parks. You’ll find tons of great spots to throw down your picnic blanket and curl up with your toes in the grass and a good book on your lap. Pack a picnic and make a day of it!

 

Want to meet people?

As much as I enjoy the pleasure of my own company, there are limits to how much alone-time I need. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to mingle with strangers when you’re visiting Bend.

Ahhh….this is the life!

Book an outing with Wanderlust Tours, and bond with your fellow travelers while snowshoeing, canoeing, caving, or enjoying countless other tours they offer year-round.

Ditto that for a rafting adventure with Sun Country Tours or a kayak tour with Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe.

And if you’re looking for an activity or event that’s catered to your specific interests, scope out Visit Bend’s event calendar. There, you can search for film screenings, athletic competitions, concerts, art gallery openings, culinary events, and more.

6 reasons Bend is better than Hawaii (don’t tell my parents!)

April 6th, 2017

I just returned from a blissful week-long vacation on the island of Kauai, where my parents were kind enough to retire so I could visit them there regularly.

That may not have been their sole motivation.

The destination was warm, lush, tropical, beautiful and sooo . . . not Bend.

Don’t get me wrong. There’s a lot to be said for a relaxing Hawaiian vacation in paradise. But here are 6 reasons I think Bend makes a better destination.

Can we not tell my parents about this?

 

Easier standup paddleboarding

One of my favorite warm-weather activities is standup paddleboarding, and I’ve been lucky enough to do it on rivers, lakes, and ocean bays throughout the six years I’ve been paddling.

Blogger Tawna with her dog, Bindi, on their standup paddleboard in the Deschutes River.

While I’ll admit that toppling into a warm ocean is a bit more pleasant than a tumble into a glacier-fed river, the relative stillness of lakes and rivers means you’re much less likely to topple at all. I’d been SUPing for years without a single fall off my board when I first tried it in Kalapaki Bay on Kauai. Within the first five minutes, a wave knocked my butt right into the water.

Now granted, you can do your SUPing year-round in Kauai, but there’s a reason Outside magazine named Bend the best SUP getaway in the world. It’s the beauty, the variety, and the phenomenal availability of the sport right here in our little high desert oasis.

 

Dry heat, dry cold

Ever notice how an 80-degree day feels much hotter in a humid climate like Florida than it does in a drier locale? The same holds true for “damp cold” (the sort you experience on a winter’s day in Portland) versus “dry cold” (the kind we have here in the mountainous high desert of Bend).

Bend’s desert climate means there’s no such thing as “damp cold” or “humid heat.”

It’s an important distinction.

Dampness has a way of making temperatures feel super-intense, which can be downright uncomfortable at the extremes of either end.

That’s one thing I’ve always loved about Bend. The dryness of our desert climate means 75-degrees feels like 75-degrees, and 35-degrees feels like 35-degrees. No need to account for humidity!

 

More room to spread out           

I know Bend locals sometimes fret about crowding at popular hiking trails and scenic landmarks. It’s one reason the Visit Like a Local movement took hold as a way of encouraging folks to help preserve our natural spaces.

Luckily, Bend has lots of those natural spaces to choose from. We certainly have more than an island constrained on all sides by a large body of water.

Two of the best Bend books you can possibly get your hands on will help you explore some of the area’s lesser-known attractions.

Too many hikers on Green Lakes Trail? Head someplace less-trafficked like the Oregon Badlands Wilderness or some of the areas west of Sisters. Pick an area along the Deschutes River Trail, many of which boast plentiful parking.

One of the best investments you can make in your quest to explore Central Oregon is a good guide book that opens your eyes to lesser-known trails and vistas. Two of my faves are Bend Overall by Scott Cook and Bend, Oregon Daycations (Day Trips for Curious Families), by Kim Cooper Findling. We sell both in the Bend Visitor Center, and I’d highly recommend either one to spark a host of new ideas for where to play and explore in Bend.

 

Cool critters

I love the tropical fish and birds that Hawaii has to offer, and feeding peacocks at Smith Gardens is one of my favorite Kauai activities. That said, I always feel like something’s missing in the critter department.

Bend is brimming with tons of unique critters!

That’s one thing I love about Bend. Any trek through the wilderness will expose you to oodles of creatures that might include eagles, falcons, otters, beavers, deer, elk, porcupines, and bats.

And while small mammals can decimate a place like Hawaii (i.e. the mongoose problem on the Big Island), little fuzzy guys like chipmunks, raccoons, squirrels, pikas, and rabbits frolic freely around Central Oregon, kept in check by predators like foxes, coyotes, and cougars who think they’re the best snacks ever.

 

Lower prices

Hey, I don’t blame the Hawaiian Islands for jacking up prices on things like sunscreen or fresh produce. It takes a lot of money and resources to transport those things to the islands.

Shopping in Bend is pretty darn reasonable.

But that’s not an issue here in Bend, with plentiful access to produce, relatively low gas prices, and budget-friendly hotels and vacation rentals that won’t require you to take out a second mortgage.

Tip: Pay cash when you can in Bend, instead of whipping out the plastic. Not only does it save vendors from getting hit with extra fees (which keeps prices lower for all of us!) but it’s a great way to track your vacation budget.

 

What’s that smell?

No place on earth smells quite like Bend. It’s this unique combination of sun-warmed desert sage and juniper that makes my heart feel happy every time I return home from vacation and crack the car window open just to breathe it in.

It smells like home, and there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.

 

The perfect day in Bend, according to Courtney Van Fossan of Bend Electric Bikes

March 30th, 2017

Oh, blog readers. I have a treat for you!

For almost 7 years, you’ve gotten my weekly reports about my favorite things to do and see around town, including detailed itineraries for my perfect day in Bend.

But every now and then (like when I go on vacation!) I invite a special guest blogger to share his or her idea of a perfect Bend day. This week I summoned Courtney Van Fossan, whose job title is “Cultural Agent of Change” (love it!) with Bend Electric Bikes.

You can find their tours through The Bend Tour Company, and you can find Courtney’s idea of a perfect day in Bend below. Take it away, Courtney!

***

Courtney and her family prepare to set out for a ride.

I’ve lived in Bend for about 5 years and, while I would call Bend a “small-ish” town, I never run out of new things to do and places to explore.  The main reason I relocated here was to ditch the car and enjoy a biking/walking lifestyle with my kids.  While there is always more progress to be made, Bend hasn’t disappointed. I ride and walk almost everywhere with a little help from electric cargo/family bikes.

 

Early Rising and Mount Bachelor

We woke up early and headed to Mt. Bachelor for a couple hours of skiing and snowboarding. We’re enjoying our first season at the mountain and took advantage of the Ski and Ride in 5 program offered for folks who are new to snow sports.

Bundled up and ready to bike for their snow play!

Now that we’ve graduated, we ski and snowboard as a family and it has been an invaluable bonding experience. I can’t recommend it enough—your kids will thank you for it! My son, Ike (age 9) loves the new Cloudchaser lift, and let me tell you, it’s a different world up there! The wide open views are stunning. Ike is also our mountain guide and helped plan our route for the day. With so many trails to explore, I’m glad we have him!

We often enjoy biking to the Park & Ride and taking the shuttle to the mountain, which is a convenient way to reduce traffic headed to the mountain and to avoid the fight for a parking space.

 

Urban Trails – Hidden Gems of the East Side

Our life revolves around family biking and working at a bike shop definitely helps when it comes to fun options for tootling around town and using our awesome Bend Urban Trail System.

The Community Labyrinth off the Coyner Trailhead.

We stopped at the shop to grab a couple of family/cargo bikes as an alternate to our usual ride—we like variety! I wanted to put a new family bike, the Benno Boost, to the test so we grabbed it and a nicely accessorized Xtracycle set up for family fun. The bike shop recently partnered with The Bend Tour Company and will be offering fun new eBike tours, so our exploration was part family time and part research into the best family riding in Bend.

My kids and I have been family biking since they were wee ones and they are the experts, giving me plenty of feedback on comfort, safety and fun factor.  Both bikes got the stamp of approval from kids and parents.

We chose to explore the Coyner and Larkspur Trails, which are accessible on the east side of town. We picked up the Coyner Trailhead which is near Franklin and the 8th/9th Street roundabout. A community garden and a smooth, paved path enticed us to get going and see what we could find. Our first discovery was the Community Labyrinth, right off the trail.  We stopped and ran around and around. The posted sign says, “The circular nature of a labyrinth reminds us that life is a journey rather than a destination.” That’s the truth, and it certainly worked for us!

Watching skaters at Ponderosa Skate Park.

We continued on the trail and came to Ponderosa Skate Park where we saw the beginnings of skateboarding season with a bunch of kids doing some amazing tricks—we could have watched for hours!  After the skate park cleared a bit, we took some turns on our bikes and enjoyed the smooth concrete. We’ll be sharpening our family biking stunts in the coming months!

Next, we stopped at the Ponderosa Park playground, which is set up on a hill. The slide was the favorite for the day. It was long and fast—high marks from the shortstuffs. Our ride took us around the Bend Senior Center and we lollygagged on the trail for quite a while longer, enjoying the freedom and safety of the car-free path.  We like to take advantage of these trails whenever we can and they are such a nice relief from the traffic on the roads.

 

Doggy time & curling—new and old Bend traditions

Georgia walks Alice, the dog.

We had to take a break from the trail for a bit to head home and check on our new pup, Alice.  We recently adopted her from the Humane Society of Central Oregon and she’s not quite ready to for the excitement of the trails and dog parks along the way.  We had several visits to meet dogs and take them on walks before we adopted Alice. Many of us miss our pets when we’re traveling and this way, so this is one way to give you time with a cuddly dog or cat and give them some much needed exercise and attention.

Curling at the Pavilion.

We live a few short blocks from Miller’s Landing Park, where there is a wonderful paved trail that connects to the Old Mill District and the Colorado Bridge over the Bend Whitewater Park.  My daughter, Georgia (age 7) and I walked Alice along the path, while Ike and Amy rode their bikes to the Pavilion where Bend curling action takes place.

Amy is new to the curling league, and was lucky to get a much coveted spot mid-season.  The sport is very popular and gives way to more on-ice inspiration at the Pavilion, which goes from ice skating, ice hockey, and curling in winter, to warm weather recreation like basketball and pickleball in the summer.

 

Another zip along the trails

Back to bikes and trails! We picked up the Larkspur Trail by way of the Bend cemetery, (a quiet place to ride!) and a quick shortcut to the tunnel under Highway 20.  The trail leads to the base of Pilot Butte State Park and around to the other side.

We took this fun and easy safe route and headed to dinner at Jackson’s Corner East.  They have a great location near the hospital with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating, fire feature, and much lighter crowds than the Westside location.

Jackson’s Corner….mmm!

We walked right in, ordered a wonderful, local, healthy meal, and relaxed. Our favorite menu items are the fusilli pasta, meatball small plate, and kale Cesar, plus any of the specials. The kids like the cheesy sticks, elbow pasta, and sometimes the kids’ entrée with steak or chicken and seasonal veggies. The cold cases are filled with all kinds of fun drinks for kids and adults, and it’s always a treat that’s well worth the ride.

We headed back on the trail, dropped off the bikes at the shop and walked home through the lovely, historic Old Bend neighborhood. I’d say most days in Bend are near perfect, but when you can avoid traffic and get around by bike with the family, enjoy trails, parks, and easy recreation, we’ve got perfect pretty well figured out. Happy kids, happy parents, and happy trails!

By the way, visitors interested in group rides should check out Bendbikes.org. They coordinate group cycling events throughout the year, and it’s a great way for Bend visitors to try a fun, local activity with other families and folks who enjoy biking.

4 things to do before winter ends in Bend

March 23rd, 2017

This past Monday was the first day of spring.

My fellow Bend residents and I gave a hearty chuckle and went back to scraping frost off our windshields.

It’s true that spring weather takes a bit longer to arrive in Bend than it does in other parts of the state, but it’s also true that winter won’t last forever.

Here are 4 things you should do before the winter of 2017 gives up the ghost.

 

Play like a kid in the snow

Those of us who spend half the year surrounded by the white stuff can get a little grumpy when snow keeps falling into April or even May.

It’s time to squeeze in that last little bit of sledding before winter ends.

But we’re the same dang people who will be dancing in the street next October, shrieking like schoolkids as we try to catch the first winter snowflakes on our tongues.

As we gear up for our summer snow hiatus, now’s the time for one last moment of reveling in it like a teenager whose chemistry final got canceled by a snow day. Plan a sledding adventure for your whole family, or head up to Mt. Bachelor to enjoy their Snowblast Tubing Park.

Drive out to one of the SnoParks and flop down on your back to make a snow angel, or gather your best buds for a snowball fight. You can even build a snowman, complete with a jaunty winter cap and carrot nose.

Now cap the whole thing off with a mug of cocoa around your favorite fire pit. Congratulations! You’ve officially checked winter off your 2017 bucket list.

Take advantage of Mt. Bachelor’s Springtacular deal

You may not know this, but Mt. Bachelor is home to one of the longest spring ski and snowboard seasons in the world. The season runs all the way through Memorial Day Weekend, and savvy travelers and locals know how to make the most of it.

Mt. Bachelor’s Springtacular pass is your ticket to more bluebird days on the slopes.

Last week, Mt. Bachelor announced its annual Springtacular Season Pass, which is your ticket to riding up to 56 days in April and May. At $199 for adults and less for kids and seniors, it’s a screamin’ deal that pays for itself after your third visit.

The lowest price on the Springtacular Pass is only available through Sunday, April 2. Prices go up starting Monday, April 3 (which is the first day the pass becomes valid to use) so hurry up and snatch one now to make the most of the best spring skiing around.

 

Sip those seasonal beers on the Bend Ale Tail

There are certain beers that just taste better when the weather is chilly.

Time is running out to sip some of winter’s best seasonal beers in the setting they’re made for.

There are also certain beers that are only available seasonally, either on draft at your favorite Bend Ale Trail stop, or in cans and bottles.

Right now, your days are numbered for sipping a frothy pint of Luck of the Eastside (an ultra-rich, creamy stout) next to a fire pit at Worthy Brewing.

You’re also running out of time to enjoy Red Chair NWIPA from Deschutes Brewery, either in seasonally-offered bottles, or on nitro at the pub.

Other beers—like [Banished] Tough Love Barrel-Aged Imperial Stout from Crux Fermentation Project—are available year-round, but they just don’t taste the same on a hot summer day as they do when you’re swilling it in the hot tub at your Bend vacation rental while snowflakes flutter around you.

 

Go snowshoeing with Wanderlust Tours

One of my favorite perks of working for Visit Bend is that I’ve had the pleasure of sampling every possible adventure offered by Wanderlust Tours.

Your days are numbered for enjoying the magical experience of Wanderlust’s Bonfire on the Snow tour.

And while I love outings like the year-round Cave Tours, or the warm-weather Canoe and Kayak Tours, there’s something extra magical about their Bonfire on the Snow snowshoe outing.

Participants snowshoe to a magical amphitheater carved into the snow, and sample locally-made goodies next to a bonfire under the stars. The whole thing includes all your gear, transportation, and the services of a super-knowledgeable naturalist snowshoe guide.

As you might imagine, that one isn’t offered in mid-July, so now’s the time to book if you don’t want to wait until next year!

5 ways Bend, Oregon is a sneaky, lying liar who lies to you

March 16th, 2017

It was 67 degrees in Bend yesterday, and I rode a bike home without gloves or a hat before lounging on my front porch in a short-sleeved top with an ice-cold beer.

Blogger Tawna enjoyed a sunny ride home (in a dress!) earlier this week on a trusty steed from Bend Electric Bikes.

It’s all a big lie.

Not the bike or the beer (a fab little cruiser from Bend Electric Bikes and a delicious can of Gimme Mo’ from Crux Fermentation Project, thank you very much).

But this spring-like weather is a tease we see every year in Bend. We’ll get a few warm, sunny days in March that’ll have us all busting out summer dresses and paddleboards until the next snowy day chases us all back inside for a bit longer.

I’m not saying it’ll snow again this season (though my status as a fourth-generation Oregon living half her life in Bend suggests it’s likely). But I am saying Bend has a history as a big fat liar. What proof?

 

The spring weather tease

It’s a pattern here in the high desert. A few warm, sunny days of spring will have us cranking the air conditioning in mid-March, and the little crocuses around Downtown Bend will pop their heads out. Visitors and newcomers will frolic in shorts and tanks, saying things like, “Wow, spring comes early here!”

Little yellow crocuses poking their heads up in Downtown Bend this week.

Don’t be fooled.

Then the frost will hit. Or maybe an all-out snowstorm. Hey, I was here one year we saw snow in July.

The upside of all this is that you’re not forced to choose just one kind of Bend experience. If you love skiing or snuggling by a fire pit in gloves and a puffy coat, you can do that in the springtime. If you also love mountain biking or walking the river trail in short sleeves, you can do that, too—often in the same weekend.

Basically, Bend’s little fibs give you the best of both worlds.

 

Not just a beer town

You’ve heard Bend dubbed “BeerTown USA.”

You’ve heard about the legendary Bend Ale Trail, or maybe even journeyed here for Bend Ale Trail Month in November.

As the official PR Chick for Visit Bend, I see a new Bend-is-the-world’s-greatest-beer-destination article in some major publication nearly every week. It would be easy to buy into the hype and assume Bend’s nothing but a beer town.

In reality, nothing’s further from the truth.

Don’t be fooled! Bend’s not just a beer town.

We’ve got a killer cocktail scene, with hotspots like 10 Below, Dogwood Cocktail Cabin, and The Barrel Thief Lounge offering delectable concoctions crafted with local spirits and unique ingredients. If you’d rather go straight to the source, Bend boasts a number of renowned distilleries (don’t miss the brand new Crater Lake Tasting Room from Bendistillery in Downtown Bend!)

Bend also has at least half-a-dozen kombucha breweries in town, and you’ll find this healthful, fermented beverage on tap at lots of local pubs and restaurants. Parilla Grill (one of my favorite lunch spots) has three taps flowing with kombucha from CaboostBucha Buena, and Humm Kombucha—all of which are based in Bend. You can also fill a growler with kombucha at places like The Growler Guys and Food 4 Less (both of which have Humm Kombucha and Brew Dr. Kombucha on tap).

Bend’s hard cider scene is also top-notch, and you’ll always find a few local cideries among the tap handles of local growler fill stations. There are currently three cideries on the roster in Bend, and you’ll find all of them along the Drinkable Diversions route.

Can’t decide which to try? Don’t choose! Hit one cidery, one distillery, one brewery, and one winery, with the Local Pour Tour. They’ll drive you to and from your hotel, hitting all four stops and even providing a light appetizer along the way!

 

If you drop a gum wrapper in the woods, would anyone notice?

Bend’s wilderness areas are so vast and open that it’s easy to fall prey to the notion that a dropped bit of Kleenex or a forgotten pile of dog doody won’t make a difference.

Visit Bend staffer Hank Therien has been teaching his young daughter to always pack a trash bag on hikes to pick up garbage left behind on the trail.

Don’t buy that crap.

In Bend, we believe in picking up after ourselves and following Leave No Trace ethics. It’s what helps to keep our wilderness areas pristine and beautiful.

For more ideas on helping with the cause, check out our Visit Like a Local page.

 

You can’t ski and golf in the same day, can you?

When you’re up there on the slopes at Mt. Bachelor, it seems impossible to think that with a 20 minute drive, you could be teeing off on one of 24 local golf courses.

Likewise, when you’re cruising the mountain bike trails in short sleeves and sunshine, how wacky does it seem to think that just a few miles up the hill, people are shredding the slopes in thick, puffy coats?

Believe it, though!

The rapid elevation gain that makes it all possible is one of Bend’s most charming attributes. It’s a feature that made Rad Season take note in their recent article about the “Bend Double” (the ability to ski and bike in the same day).

 

Casual vibe ≠ no reservations required

Whether you’re camping or staying in a hotel, don’t fall prey to the fable that you don’t need a reservation. Book ahead so you won’t be disappointed!

If I had a beer for every time I’ve watched baffled tourists walk into the Visitor Center expressing confusion over their inability to find a last-second room or campsite, I’d have . . . well, more beer than I should probably drink in a week.

The problem is two-fold: longtime Oregonians who spent childhood vacations in Bend are remembering the sleepy little town where you could show up on a Saturday in August and expect to find vacant rooms and campsites galore. But Bend’s popularity has made that unlikely these days, particularly in peak season between May and September.

Then, there’s the lie. See, Bend is such a mellow, laidback kinda town, that people just assume it’s not the sort of place where you need a reservation.

Don’t fall for it.

And don’t be disappointed. Be a smart traveler and research Bend lodging before your trip, then book ahead to get your top pick.

 

 

 

5 places to dine outside when the weather’s chilly in Bend

March 9th, 2017

Outdoor dining in Bend is as common as craft beer, golden retrievers, puffy jackets, and Subarus loaded with bike gear.

In other words, no Bend vacation is complete without a few of those things.

While patio dining with a river views is a hallmark of summer, and noshing next to a fire pit is a quintessential winter experience, what about those in-between times when the weather is less-than-ideal?

No worries! Here are 5 places you can eat outdoors even when the weather outside is frightful.

 

McKay Cottage

One of Bend’s most popular breakfast spots, McKay Cottage is famous for its scrumptious hashes, delectable croissant-style French toast, and melt-in-your-mouth bacon.

Snuggle up in a blanket with a mini fire pit in the center of your table at McKay Cottage.

The aforementioned popularity means wait times on weekend mornings can be long, especially in mid-summer when everyone’s jockeying for spots in their sunny outdoor courtyard.

But in fall, winter, and spring when temps are chilly and outdoor dining isn’t at the top of most folks’ to-do list, you can skate right to the front of the waiting list by requesting one of those patio tables.

The tables boast gas fire pits in the center, and your server will cheerfully bring you a stash of blankets to help ward off the chill.

Bundled up in your blankie, you can order tasty belly-warming favorites like the Hoodoo Hash made with golden-brown sweet potatoes, all-natural prime beef brisket, caramelized onions, roasted peppers, Grafton Village smoked cheddar, poached eggs, and house-made hollandaise. It’s served with a homemade butter scone and fresh fruit and is huge enough to split or to package up for leftovers the next day.

 

Sunriver Brewing (Galveston Pub in Bend)

It’s a fact that craft beer tastes better outdoors, and few pleasures rival the experience of sipping a pint next to a fire pit at your favorite stop on the Bend Ale Trail.

Have you ever eaten dinner inside a covered bridge? You can do it at Sunriver Brewing’s Galveston Pub.

But for a truly unique outdoor dining experience at a brewery, check out the Sunriver Brewing Company’s Galveston Pub in Bend. Their indoor space has an industrial vibe and garage doors that open up in summer, while the outdoor space has a fab fire pit to keep you toasty.

But best of all is what’s adjacent to that fire pit. It’s an incredible replica of the Shevlin Covered Bridge, with a spacious row of tables inside. The space is kept toasty warm with heat lamps, and open to the elements on either end.

Bonus: On chilly nights, there’s usually a shorter wait-time for spots inside the bridge than there is for an indoor table.

Double-Bonus: The kids’ menu here is one of my faves, with entrees like mini hand-dipped corndogs, pulled pork sliders, mac & cheese, chicken strips, and more. Each comes with your choice from a list of sides that includes fresh fruit or cold veggies with ranch dip (a great way to make sure the young’uns are eating healthy).

Triple-Bonus: Pineapple poppers made with pepper bacon-wrapped pineapple, queso fresco, jalapeños, and burgundy reduction. Need I say more?

 

The Lot

For the crème de la crème of outdoor dining in Bend, look no further than The Lot.

So many tasty (and cozy!) dining options at The Lot.

This one-of-a-kind eatery offers a unique spin on the food cart pods you find in many cities. A cluster of culinary trailers surrounds an open-air seating area with built-in tables, heated seats, and overhead heaters that keep the space nice and toasty.

There’s a bar with 16 tap handles, and plenty of space for families, dogs, or a group of pals to hang out. They’re open seven days a week, rain or shine, and can keep you toasty even on the chilliest days.

The food carts themselves offer a huge variety to choose from.  A La Carte is my personal fave, with unique creations like their gorgonzola bacon fries, a mouthwatering array of tacos, and their famous mint lemonade. The winter months bring out their scrumptious lemongrass and coconut milk clam chowder, which is TO DIE FOR.

 

10 Barrel Brewing

As I said before, many of the stops on the Bend Ale Trail have fire pits, but the one at 10 Barrel takes the prize for size and flexible seating.

The massive fire pit is the centerpiece of the courtyard at 10 Barrel.

You can fit a buttload of beer drinkers around it without feeling too crowded or giving up privacy. I’ve enjoyed countless romantic beer outings here with my hubby on the wide bench seats that allow us to snuggle up and tune out the other people around us.

Of course, if you feel like being social, it’s also a good place to chat up your fellow travelers or locals coming down from a long day on the slopes. There’s room enough for everyone!

Tip: Study the menu closely for their awesome suggestions on which beers pair best with each dish. Also, their pizzas here are OUTSTANDING.

 

Kebaba

Okay, so what if it’s really lousy outside? Like snowing sideways with winds gusting hard enough to make even semi-open-air dining impossible.

The outside of Kebaba’s enclosed sun porch.

What you really need is a way to dine in a clear plastic bubble, complete with heat lamps, heated benches, and beautiful views of the outdoors. But where would you find such a thing?

At Kebaba, of course!

This charming little Middle Eastern bistro features mouthwatering kebabs, babaganoush, gyros, schwarmas, and hands-down the best hummus I’ve ever eaten (seriously—I don’t even like most hummus, but I once drove across town in a snowstorm at rush hour just to get my hands on theirs).

Tasty lunch from inside the Kebaba bubble.

But back to the plastic bubble. The whole restaurant is situated in a charming craftsman bungalow, and the bubble is essentially a sun porch screened in with clear plastic panels. You still get the charm of outdoor dining and views of their pretty courtyard, but you stay nice and toasty and dry.

My favorite dish here is the karnabeet, which is a cauliflower dish that’s simply out-of-this-world. Their lunch plates are affordable and flavorful, or come for dinner and scope out plastic bubble dining with the magic of twinkle lights around you.

 

 

 

The 6 worst souvenirs imaginable (and why you should pick them up in Bend, Oregon)

March 2nd, 2017

You know those T-shirts that say, “My mom went to Yellowstone and all she brought me was this lousy shirt?”

Um, yeah. The souvenirs I’m about to suggest to you are way worse. Like “what the @#%$ are you thinking?!” worse.

Make sure you pick up Fido’s business when you’re recreating around Bend.

Nevertheless, there’s a reason you should pick up these six things in Bend, Oregon.

 

Dog doo

Bend was named the nation’s dog-friendliest city by Dog Fancy magazine, and you know what that means?

Lotsa dogs = lotsa dog doodie.

Fortunately, locals know that good manners (not to mention the law) dictate you pick up after your pooch. Even more fortunately, you’ll find dog doo baggies all over town, including nearly all of Bend’s 80+ public parks.

Need extras? There’s a dispenser right outside my office window at the Bend Visitor Center, so grab one when you swing by for maps and travel tips (bonus: Our office is super dog-friendly, so bring Fido inside for some ear scritches from the staff).

You can also visit Bend Pet Express to buy a big stash of doodie bags for your very own. If you really want to generate some good karma, use those baggies to grab an extra nugget or two left behind by dog owners less responsible than you. I promise it’ll make you feel good.

After you stop gagging, I mean.

 

Trash

Folks in Bend are big proponents of Leave No Trace ethics on hiking trails and around town. You can read about it on our Visit Like a Local page, or see it in action when you watch fellow hikers stop to pick up bits of trash that don’t even belong to them.

Packing a reusable beverage container will help reduce cans and bottles left behind on trails.

Want to pitch in? Stuff a small garbage sack in your backpack or pocket before set out for a walk or hike. As you go, stop every now and then to pick up a stray bottlecap or gum wrapper. It’s a great way to ensure you’ll always leave your favorite Bend trail just a little nicer than you found it.

 

Bottles and cans

This one goes along with the one about picking up trash, but there’s an added bonus for you if you stop to pick up stray cans and bottles left behind in parks and trails.

Thanks to Oregon’s Bottle Bill (which has been around since 1971), you can return cans and bottles for a deposit that ranges from 5-10-cents. That’s not a bad way to pick up a little pocket change (which makes a way better souvenir than the bottles and cans themselves).

Go here to find the redemption center closest to your Bend hotel or vacation rental. You can also go here to learn more about which bottles and cans are eligible for redemption.

Oh, and if you want to go a step further with reducing the number of cans and bottles in circulation, buy a reusable water bottle or growler from Hydro Flask or DrinkTanks. Not only will it keep your drink cool (or hot!), but you’ll be supporting a Bend-based business with your purchase.

Napkins can sometimes get away from you when you’re dining outdoors in Bend. To generate good napkin karma, just pick them up whenever you see one floating around.

 

Stray napkins

One of the few things I don’t love about Bend is the prevalence of windy days. Unexpected wind gusts, combined with the popularity of outdoor dining in Bend, can turn a perfectly responsible human being into an unintentional litterbug in the blink of an eye.

That’s why you should always scoop up stray napkins if you spot one on the ground. If we all make a habit of it, some good Samaritan will pick up your escaped napkin the next time a sudden breeze swipes it from your hand and carries it miles from your dinner table.

 

Giardia

When I was 19, I contracted giardia while hiking in Montana and drinking from a creek along a deer migration path. It’s an experience I don’t recommend.

But if you enjoy symptoms like fatigue, nausea, and vomiting, giardia might be right up your alley! And since few places on earth are as beautiful as Bend, you may as well pick it up right here in Central Oregon.

Yes, the deer are cute. But they can also spread giardia, so don’t drink untreated water in the wilderness.

The best way to contract giardia is by eating yellow snow or drinking water contaminated by animal feces. Yummy!

Of course, if giardia doesn’t sound like your idea of a great souvenir, you should skip sucking water straight from creeks or rivers when you’re out hiking. Pack the aforementioned Hydro Flask or DrinkTanks with plenty of extra water to make sure you stay hydrated. If you absolutely must drink creek water when camping in the backcountry, make sure you have a good water filter or water treatment system in your pack.

 

Lend a helping hand if you spot a stray glove on the ground.

Single gloves

We’ve all seen one. That single glove lying forlorn and alone on the fresh snow beneath the chairlift. It’s a common sight at any ski resort, including Mt. Bachelor.

It sucks to be that person who dropped a glove, and sucks even more not to be able to locate your lost glove during an epic day of powder skiing.

Do a solid for your fellow snow enthusiast: If you see a stray glove, pick it up and deliver it to the lift operator at the bottom of that run. Not only will it keep the slopes safe and clear, but it’ll save a stranger from chilly fingers.

10 ways to make the most of Zwickelmania 2017

February 23rd, 2017

For as long as I can remember, Oregon’s statewide celebration of craft beer has taken place Presidents’ Day Weekend. But Central Oregon shook things up for Zwickelmania 2017.

Blogger Tawna in her Girl vs. Beer t-shirt (the unofficial uniform of Zwickelmania).

While Portland held the event as usual last weekend, Central Oregon is hosting Zwickelmania 2017 on February 25 instead.

While I’m personally bummed because I’ll be out of town, I’m professionally thrilled to bits. No more fighting holiday weekend crowds to get your beer, or splitting your time between Zwickelmania and Oregon Winterfest. Beer fans can devote a whole, luxurious afternoon to the one glorious day when breweries throw their doors wide open for tours, tastings, and more.

Planning to attend Zwickelmania 2017? Here are 10 tips to make the most of your experience!

 

Study up

There are oodles of online resources to help you achieve Zwicklemania nirvana, and it pays to study them before you’ve had a sip of beer.

Review the map to plot your best route between participating breweries.

Skim the online directory so you know what each brewery is offering in terms of beer samples, food, live music, tours, and other amenities.

Follow the Oregon Brewers’ Guild on Instagram and Twitter for up-to-the-minute info on Zwickelmania, and sign in on the Facebook event page so everyone knows you’re going.

It’s like cramming for a test, but soooooo much better.

 

Be selective

When it comes to completing a Bend Ale Trail passport, you can take years to do it.

The official 2017 Zwickelmania map.

But your time is limited when it comes to Zwickelmania 2017, so it’s okay to be choosy. With sixteen breweries participating from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., it’s not physically possible to hit them all unless you plan to dash through the door, grab a beer, and pound it while sprinting to the next brewery.

I don’t recommend that.

What I do recommend is pinpointing a handful of breweries on the list that you really, truly want to visit. Maybe you’re dying to ask questions of the head brewer at McMenamins, or maybe it’s your life’s ambition to taste special brews straight from the Zwickel at Crux. Perhaps you’ve been wanting to see KC Flynn perform at Cascade Lakes Brewing, or maybe you really want to sample the cold-brew cocktails they’ll be doling out at Deschutes.

Bottom line: Pick what you most want to see/do/drink/eat and start there. Then work your way down the list.

 

Go with a full tummy

The event kickoff at 11 a.m. can throw you for a loop if you show up several hours post-breakfast and fail to get something substantial in your belly before you start guzzling beer. That’s why it’s key to grab a good snack before you set out.

Protein-rich foods like chicken or salmon take longer to digest, which will slow how fast your blood alcohol level goes up. Foods high on the glycemic index like pasta are also a good bet, since alcohol changes your body’s stores of glycogen (a quick energy source stored in the liver).

Depending on weather, many of the breweries serve up Zwickelmania suds outdoors.

It’s also smart to snack along the way so you’re filling your belly with something besides beer suds. Most breweries will be doling out free food, so take advantage of it!

 

Pay attention to location

While many breweries are hosting Zwickelmania 2017 festivities at their actual pub, some are throwing open the doors at the brewing facility itself. Sometimes that’s the same place, and sometimes it isn’t.

To be safe, make sure you consult the list before setting out.

 

Buddy up to a brewer

Besides the free beer and nibbles, one of the biggest things that separates Zwickelmania from a regular trek around the Bend Ale Trail is the chance to interact with a brewer.

Chatting with brewers and checking out the brewing equipment is one of the highlights of Zwickelmania.

At most participating breweries, the brewers themselves will be on hand to answer questions, talk about the brewing process, or even pour you a pint.

It’s a great opportunity to get the inside scoop about your favorite beer direct from the guy or gal who made it, so don’t be shy! If it helps, jot down a question or two before you go.

 

Drink plenty of water

Making sure your body fluid doesn’t become 100% beer over the course of an afternoon is crucial when you’re attending a beer-centric event like this. I always stuff a Hydro Flask full of ice water in my purse and refill often as I go.

 

Leave the driving to someone else when you book an outing with the Bend Brew Bus.

Don’t even THINK of drinking and driving

There are gazillion ways to travel between breweries without risking a DUI or someone’s life. Here are just a few of them:

While Lyft and Uber aren’t yet in Bend, city officials are getting closer to making it happen (hopefully as soon as May).

But bottom line: There’s no excuse for driving while impaired. Ending up dead or in jail will put a serious damper on your Bend vacation.

 

Grab a memento

Zwicklemania is a big deal, and it’s fun to have a souvenir to commemorate it. Many participating breweries are offering deep discounts on schwag, so stock up while you can!

You definitely need this souvenir growler from Crux.

GoodLife Brewing’s Zwickelmania specials include sales on merchandise and packaged beer, while Cascade Lakes Brewing has schwag bags they’ll be handing out while supplies last.

Most others will have T-shirts and hats for sale, or pick up a logo’d growler to take home.

 

Know the secrets

Psst….want a few tidbits of insider info? Here you go:

  • Did you notice 10 Barrel Brewing isn’t listed in the lineup of participating breweries? I won’t go into the politics of why that is, but I will tell you they’re definitely still rolling out the red carpet for Zwickelmania. In fact, their Zwickelmania event is typically the first one I hit (and there have been years where I’ve just stayed there the whole day!) This year’s celebration features free Hawaiian style burgers and dogs from Mauna Kea Grill, pulled pork sliders and chicken tacos from Curb B Q, live music, and tons (literally, tons) of free beer. The event takes place at their brewing facility on NE 18th, though there’s a free shuttle from the pub that’ll run you out there and back.

    Mmmm….beer.

  • Not sure you want to spend precious Zwickelmania time driving all the way to Sisters for a visit to Three Creeks Brewing? Here’s something that’ll convince you: The brewery is hosting their annual Zwickelmania breakfast from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., with breakfast snacks, breakfast beers, tours, zwickel tastes, and coffee. It’s a great chance to get an early start before the rest of Zwickelmania festivities even start.
  • While Zwickelmania technically ends at 4 p.m., festivities run a little later at Crux Fermentation Project. From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., they’re offering behind-the-scenes tours, rare tastings from their BANISHED series (straight from the barrel!), and tons of great food including their Pork Parfait, Smoke-Aroni, and Rooster’s Kick-Ass Beef Jerky. If I were a betting woman, I’d say the food could run out earlier in the day, but it’s worth staying late anyway for great beer tasting and chats with the brewers.

 

Don’t forget your Bend Ale Trail passport

Zwicklemania is a great way to collect a whole lot of Bend Ale Trail passport stamps in one afternoon, so make sure you snag an atlas at the first brewery you visit or download the free Bend Ale Trail app.

Finished gathering stamps? The Bend Visitor Center is open seven days a week so you can collect your prize anytime. Stop by the corner of Lava and Oregon in Downtown Bend between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays or 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

 

7 tasty aphrodisiac ingredients (and where to find them!) when dining in Bend, Oregon

February 16th, 2017

Valentine’s Day may have come and gone, but there are plenty of other reasons to feel the love in Bend. I mean besides the fact that Livability.com named us one of America’s most romantic cities, or the fact that there are so many fab spots to kiss, get married, get engaged, or honeymoon in Bend.

As blogger Tawna can attest, the riverfront dining at Anthony’s will give you fond feelings for more than just the oysters.

Incidentally, this is what happens when you have a romance author writing a tourism blog.

But today I’m talking about aphrodisiacs. You know, those special ingredients that leave you feeling happy, loving, and maybe a little frisky.

Here are 7 popular aphrodisiac ingredients (and the best spots to find them!) in Bend.

 

Oysters

Let’s start with the obvious. Oysters have long been touted as aphrodisiacs, and for good reason. They’re high in zinc and contain amino acids that have been found to trigger the production of sex hormones.

So where can you find good oysters in landlocked Bend? One of my favorite go-to spots for tasty seafood in Bend is Anthony’s Home Port. They’ve got a wide variety of oyster preparations ranging from baked to pan fried to barbecued to oyster shooters. Several are included on the happy hour menu, and all are served up with stunning views of the Deschutes River.

High Tides Seafood Grill is another fab option if you’re looking for a quaint, locally-owned spot that not a ton of tourists know about. Their pan-friend oysters are legendary, or try their tasty oyster bisque when it’s in season.

 

Asparagus

Yes, it makes your pee smell weird. But if you’re sniffing pee on a date, you likely have issues that aphrodisiacs won’t solve.

Mmmm….tasty pork chop with pan sauce, mashed potatoes, and asparagus from Stihl Whiskey Bar.

In any case, asparagus is packed with potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and vitamin E, all of which help boost energy and libido. You’ll see it popping up on a lot of menus in March and April around Bend, though plenty of places offer it year-round if you know where to look.

The Green Hornet omelet at the Victorian Café features fresh spinach, asparagus, jalapeños, scallions, and Gruyere cheese in a three-egg omelet topped with avocado. That’ll pep up your morning!

If you have a hankering for sushi, try the Shogun Roll at Kanpai. It’s made with escolar, asparagus, and avocado, then tempura fried and topped with spicy salmon, tobiko, and unagi sauce.

If you’re looking for a hearty winter meal, check out the pork chop at Stihl Whiskey Bar. It’s served with a melt-in-your-mouth pan sauce, along with mashed potatoes and a generous helping of asparagus.

 

Basil

This leafy herb has several libido-boosting nutrients like vitamin A, beta carotene, and magnesium.

Caprese salad with fresh basil, along with their homemade focaccia bread at Ariana.

While basil tastes good in almost anything, one of my favorite uses is in pesto. Cibelli’s Pizza lets you add dollops of the green goodness to any pizza, so load up and chow down.

Another great use of basil is in caprese salad. You’ll find it at oodles of restaurants around Bend, but one of my personal faves is the one at Ariana Restaurant. They shake things up seasonally, depending on what’s fresh, but their use of olive oil crumbs, heirloom tomatoes, and burrata (not to mention fresh basil from their summertime garden) take this caprese to a whole new level.

 

Bananas

This tasty fruit contains bromelain, which some believe can trigger testosterone production. Whether you’re interested in testosterone or just a tasty smoothie, check out Mother’s Juice Cafe. They have three ­locations around Bend, including a brand new spot that just opened downtown.

The digestion smoothie with banana, along with their Great Grains salad from Mother’s.

Tons of their smoothies include bananas, but my personal fave is the one called Digestion (I know, I know…not a very romantic name). But the flavors are fab, with pineapple, banana, avocado, mint, ginger, cinnamon, honey, and coconut milk.

You’ll also find banana pancakes on the menu at Original Pancake House, which has a location in Bend as well as one in Redmond right by the airport (perfect if you have an early morning flight!)

 

Chili peppers

A little spice can stimulate endorphins, which are the brain’s natural feel-good chemicals. They can also speed up your heart rate, and is there anything more stereotypically romantic than having your heart flutter just a bit?

The Eggs Caesar from Chow have plenty of chilis to rev your engine.

Bend has plenty of great restaurants serving Mexican food or various forms of Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine that are brimming with good spices.

The Crying Tiger at Noi Thai Cuisine is particularly tasty pick, made with grilled flat iron steak marinated Thai style with dry chili and dipping sauce. Both Barrio and El Sancho offer a huge array of unique twists on Mexican street food, with plenty of chili-filled options to choose from.

To get your chili fix for breakfast, order the Eggs Ala Caesar at Chow. The dish features poached eggs, cheesy corn cake, roasted chilis, avocado, queso, and chili hollandaise. Bonus: Chow makes their own fresh salsas that are guaranteed to add some extra kick to your meal (and possibly your love life).

 

Champagne

I hesitate to include any alcoholic beverages in this roundup, since consent is kinda vital when we’re discussing amorous exchanges.

But if you’re limiting your intake to one drink, sparkling wine has some definite perks. Besides the fact that it lowers inhibition by slowing down the central nervous system, it also has a “giddy effervesce” that lends itself to quicker absorption.

If the swanky, intimate vibe of the dining room at 10 Below doesn’t leave you feeling romantic, the Mellow Yellow sure will!

Lots of spots around Bend offer champagne cocktails that give me the aforementioned giddiness, but I’m particularly fond of the Mellow Yellow at 10 Below. It’s made with whipped cream flavored vodka, lemon juice, and champagne syrup.

There’s also the Mirrorball at Astro Lounge, which is made with Crater Lake vodka, infused watermelon vodka, cranberry juice, simple syrup, and champagne.

I’m also smitten with the Pear to the People at Stihl Whiskey Bar, which is made with pear vodka, elderflower liqueur, fresh lemon juice, and champagne. Cheers!

 

Beets

I’ve loved beets long before I knew they had aphrodisiac properties, but I love them more knowing they’re a good source of tryptophan and betaine, which promote a feeling of well-being. They also contain high amounts of boron, a trace mineral that increases the level of sex hormones in the human body.

Beets. They make you feel good. Like reeeeeally good.

There are dozens of beet salads in Bend that make me swoony, but some of my faves can be found at Worthy Brewing, Craft Kitchen and Brewery, and Jackalope Grill. The varieties are endless, too, ranging from your standard purple-red beets to more exotic candycane beets.

I recently discovered the roasted beet salad at Stihl Whiskey Bar, which has the added bonus of an orange clove vinaigrette dressing that’s super-tasty and an amazingly unique complement to the flavors of beet and goat cheese.

Oh, and if you ever happen to find yourself at 5 Fusion on an evening they have the beet martini on the specials menu, ORDER IT! You’ll thank me later.


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